FAQs

I am filing for a green card but need to leave the U.S. in an emergency, how can I re-enter without a visa?
After we have looked at our client’s green card applications very carefully to make sure that travel outside the U.S. will not cause any problems, we help them obtain permission from the USCIS to travel. By applying for permission to travel before our clients leave the country, we have been able to stop the problem of the USCIS saying that they have abandoned their green card applications. In some cases, we advise our clients to not travel where we notice that they previously overstayed an earlier visa because that may cause problems with their green card application.
Can my 18 year old U.S. citizen daughter sponsor me for a green card?
Your U.S. citizen daughter can file for a green card for you if she is 21 years of age or older. At our law office when our clients’ U.S. children are under 21 years of age, we look to see if there are other immigration benefits that they may apply for until the children are old enough to be sponsors for a green card application.
How Can I Stop Deportation From The U.S.?
We have been able to stop deportation from the U.S. by going to immigration court with some of our clients to file immigration, criminal, and fraud waivers, asylum and withholding of removal, Convention Against Torture claims, prosecutorial discretion, cancellation of removal, green card applications or by terminating deportation proceedings. There are many different ways to stop deportation from the U.S. for suitable cases and we try to see if there are other immigration applications a client can file and then ask the judge to stop the deportation hearing, if they do qualify.

To find out if you can stop deportation from the U.S. for you or a family member, the first step is to talk to an experienced immigration lawyer who handles deportation cases in your local city. If you have criminal convictions, it is a good idea to take your criminal court records with you so that your lawyer can tell you if there will be a problem, and let you know about any waivers that may be available you.

For certain people with U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident family members, U.S. army or veteran family members, serious health problems, strong community ties, etc., we may apply for some waivers, green card applications, prosecutorial discretion, deferred action or other immigration benefits first, then we ask the judge to administratively close the case or stop deportation. Some undocumented clients are able to get a green card and some legal permanent residents are allowed to keep their green cards after they have been in deportation proceedings.

However, it is important to remember that deportation cannot be stopped or avoided for some people. Criminal convictions which are considered aggravated felonies often lead to deportation from the U.S.
My family member is in detention, can I get them out on bond?
It depends. At our law office we have been able to help people in ICE or immigration detention get bond and be released so that they can attend the court hearings from home instead of a detention center. For suitable clients, we may apply for a bond hearing with the immigration court. It is always helpful where they have friends and family members, a local place to live, can show that they will attend all court hearings if released, and have a possible immigration benefit for which they can apply. For people with criminal convictions, the immigration judge will also look at the number and type of convictions they have before deciding if they can be freed on bond. Finally, some people will not be considered suitable for bond at all for different reasons.
How can I stay in the US with a green card even though I am getting a divorce from my US citizen spouse?
When a married couple are divorcing and the foreign born husband or wife wants to stay in the U.S., we have been able to help many people in this situation by filing a waiver with the USCIS so that they can still live in the U.S. and keep their green card. If there is one suggestion I can give to anyone with this problem, it is to talk to an experienced immigration attorney early to see if you can apply for a waiver, the type of documents you will need to support your request to still be given a green card even though you are divorced and other useful information. We have also been able to help people whose spouses have died, or have been divorced before they could get the permanent green card.
Can I stay in the U.S. after a deportation order?
Certain people may be able to apply for and get a Stay of Removal after they have been ordered deported. The stay of removal may be for 6 months or up to one year. People with serious or life threatening medical conditions may need to apply for a stay of removal. If you want to apply for a stay of removal you should speak to an experienced immigration lawyer in your city immediately before a warrant for your deportation is issued by ICE.

Disclaimer

The information you obtain at this site is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation. We invite you to contact us and welcome your calls and electronic mail. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established

We help people with green cards or U.S. legal permanent residency, U.S. citizenship , U.S. visas H, R, L & E visas for work, stop deportation in immigration court, and other immigration matters. Our goal is to solve problems for our clients in a timely and cost saving manner through the use of personalized service and technology. Our prompt response to all our clients is a priority.

To make an appointment for a consultation,

Please call us at:Phone: 626 256 8500Office Hours 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST)

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